Thoughts as we head to DrupalCon Baltimore

The past weeks have been difficult. I'm well aware that the community is struggling, and it really pains me. I respect the various opinions expressed, including opinions different from my own. I want you to know that I'm listening and that I'm carefully considering the different aspects of this situation. I'm doing my best to progress through the issues and support the work that needs to happen to evolve our governance model. For those that are attending DrupalCon Baltimore and want to help, we just added a community discussions track.

There is a lot to figure out, and I know that it's difficult when there are unresolved questions. Leading up to DrupalCon Baltimore next week, it may be helpful for people to know that Larry Garfield and I are talking. As members of the Community Working Group reported this week, Larry remains a member of the community. While we figure out Larry's future roles, Larry is attending DrupalCon as a regular community member with the opportunity to participate in sessions, code sprints and issue queues.

As we are about to kick off DrupalCon Baltimore, please know that my wish for this conference is for it to be everything you've made it over the years; a time for bringing out the best in each other, for learning and sharing our knowledge, and for great minds to work together to move the project forward. We owe it to the 3,000 people who will be in attendance to make DrupalCon about Drupal. To that end, I ask for your patience towards me, so I can do my part in helping to achieve these goals. It can only happen with your help, support, patience and understanding. Please join me in making DrupalCon Baltimore an amazing time to connect, collaborate and learn, like the many DrupalCons before it.

(I have received a lot of comments and at this time I just want to respond with an update. I decided to close the comments on this post.)

Next steps for evolving Drupal's governance

The last time we made significant changes to our governance was 4 to 5 years ago [1, 2, 3]. It's time to evolve it more. We need to:

  • Update the governance model so governance policies and community membership decisions are not determined by me or by me alone. It is clear that the current governance structure of Drupal, which relies on me being the ultimate decision maker and spokesperson for difficult governance and community membership decisions, has reached its limits. It doesn't work for many in our community -- and frankly, it does not work for me either. I want to help drive the technical strategy and vision of Drupal, not be the arbiter of governance or interpersonal issues.
  • Review our the Code of Conduct. Many have commented that the intentions and scope of the Code of Conduct are unclear. For example, some people have asked if violations of the Code of Conduct are the only reasons for which someone might be removed from our community, whether Community Working Group decisions can be made based on actions outside of the Drupal community, or whether we need a Code of Conduct at all. These are all important questions that need clear answers.

I believe that to achieve the best outcome, we will:

  1. Organize both in-person and virtual roundtables during and after DrupalCon Baltimore to focus on gathering direct feedback from the community on evolving our governance.
  2. Refocus the 2-day meeting of the Drupal Association's Board of Directors at DrupalCon Baltimore to discuss these topics.
  3. Collect ideas in the issue queue of the Drupal Governance project. We will share a report from the roundtable discussions (point 1) and the Drupal Association Board Meeting (point 2) in the issue queue so everything is available in one place.
  4. Actively solicit help from experts on diversity, inclusion, experiences of marginalized groups, and codes of conduct and governance. This could include people from both inside and outside the Drupal community (e.g. a leader from another community who is highly respected). I've started looking into this option with the help of the Drupal Association and members of the Community Working Group. We are open to suggestions.

In order to achieve these aims, we plan to organize an in-person Drupal Community Governance sprint the weeks following DrupalCon Baltimore, involving members of the Drupal Association, Community Working Group, the Drupal Diversity & Inclusion group, outside experts, as well as some community members who have been critical of our governance. At the sprint, we will discuss feedback gathered by the roundtables, as well as discussions during the 2-day board meeting at DrupalCon Baltimore, and turn these into concrete proposals: possible modifications to the Code of Conduct, structural changes, expectations of leadership, etc. These proposals will be open for public comment for several weeks or months, to be finalized by DrupalCon Vienna.

We're still discussing these plans but I wanted to give you some insight in our progress and thinking; once the plans are finalized we'll share them on Drupal.org. Let us know your thoughts on this framework. I'm looking forward to working on solutions with others in the community.

An apology to the Drupal community

Last week Megan Sanicki, executive director of the Drupal Association, and I published a joint statement. In this blog post, I wanted to follow up with a personal statement focused on the community at large.

I've talked to a lot of people the last two weeks, and it is clear to me that our decisions have caused much alarm and distress in our community. I feel this follow-up is important even though I know it doesn't undo the hurt I've caused.

I want to deeply apologize for causing grief and uncertainty, especially to those in the BDSM and kink communities who felt targeted by the turmoil. This incident was about specific actions of a single member of our community. This was never meant to be about sexual practices or kinks, so it pains me that I unintentionally hurt you. I do support you and respect you as a key part of our community.

Shortly after I started Drupal more than 15 years ago, I based its core values on openness and equality. Gender, race, religion, beliefs, sexuality ... all are welcome in our community. We've always had people with wildly different views and identities. When we walk into a sprint at DrupalCon, we've been able to put our opinions aside, open our laptops, and start collaborating. Diversity has always been a feature, not a bug. I strongly feel that this foundation is what made Drupal what it is today; a global family.

Serving a community as unique and diverse as Drupal is both rewarding and challenging. We've navigated through several defining moments and transitions in our history. I feel what we are going through now is another one of these defining moments for our culture and community. In an excruciating but illuminating way this has shown some of what is best about our community: we care. I'm reminded that what brings us together, what we all have in common, is our love and appreciation of open-source software. Drupal is a positive force, a collective lifting by thousands and thousands, created and maintained by those individuals cooperating toward a common goal, whose other interests have no need to be aligned.

I want to help our community heal and I'm open to learn and change. As one of the next steps, I will make a follow-up post on improving our governance to a healthier model that does not place such sensitive decisions on me. I love this community, and recognize that the things we hold in common are more important than our differences.

(Comments on this post are allowed but for obvious reasons will be moderated.)

Living our values

The Drupal community is committed to welcome and accept all people. That includes a commitment to not discriminate against anyone based on their heritage or culture, their sexual orientation, their gender identity, and more. Being diverse has strength and as such we work hard to foster a culture of open-mindedness toward differences.

A few weeks ago, I privately asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor, to leave the Drupal project. I did this because it came to my attention that he holds views that are in opposition with the values of the Drupal project.

I had hoped to avoid discussing this decision publicly out of respect for Larry's private life, but now that Larry has written about it on his blog and it is being discussed publicly, I believe I have no choice but to respond on behalf of the Drupal project.

It's not for me to judge the choices anyone makes in their private life or what beliefs they subscribe to. I also don't take any offense to the role-playing activities or sexual preferences of Larry's alternative lifestyle.

What makes this difficult to discuss, is that it is not for me to share any of the confidential information that I've received, so I won't point out the omissions in Larry's blog post. However, I can tell you that those who have reviewed Larry's writing, including me, suffered from varying degrees of shock and concern.

In the end, I fundamentally believe that all people are created equally. This belief has shaped the values that the Drupal project has held since it's early days. I cannot in good faith support someone who actively promotes a philosophy that is contrary to this. The Gorean philosophy promoted by Larry is based on the principle that women are evolutionarily predisposed to serve men and that the natural order is for men to dominate and lead.

While the decision was unpleasant, the choice was clear. I remain steadfast in my obligation to protect the shared values of the Drupal project. This is unpleasant because I appreciate Larry's many contributions to Drupal, because this risks setting a complicated precedent, and because it involves a friend's personal life. The matter is further complicated by the fact that this information was shared by others in a manner I don't find acceptable either and will be dealt with separately.

However, when a highly-visible community member's private views become public, controversial, and disruptive for the project, I must consider the impact that his words and actions have on others and the project itself. In this case, Larry has entwined his private and professional online identities in such a way that it blurs the lines with the Drupal project. Ultimately, I can't get past the fundamental misalignment of values.

Collectively, we work hard to ensure that Drupal has a culture of diversity and inclusion. Our goal is not just to have a variety of different people within our community, but to foster an environment of connection, participation and respect. We have a lot of work to do on this and we can't afford to ignore discrepancies between the espoused views of those in leadership roles and the values of our culture. It's my opinion that any association with Larry's belief system is inconsistent with our project's goals.

It is my responsibility and obligation to act in the best interest of the project at large and to uphold our values. Decisions like this are unpleasant and disruptive, but important. It is moments like this that test our commitment to our values. We must stand up and act in ways that demonstrate these values. For these reasons, I'm asking Larry to resign from the Drupal project.

Update March 24th

After reading hundreds of responses, I wanted to make a clarifying statement. First, I made the decision to ask Larry not to participate in the Drupal project, and separately, the Drupal Association made a decision not to invite Larry to speak at DrupalCon Baltimore or serve as a track chair for it. I can only speak to my decision-making here. It's worth noting that I recused myself from the Drupal Association's decision.

Many have rightfully stated that I haven't made a clear case for the decision. When one side chooses to make their case public it creates an imbalance of information. Only knowing one side skews public opinion heavily towards the publicized viewpoint. While I will not share the evidence that I believe would validate the decision that I made for reasons of liability and confidentiality, I will say that I did not make the decision based on the information or beliefs conveyed in Larry's blog post.

Larry accurately pointed out that some of the evidence was brought forth in a manner that is not in alignment with Drupal values. This manner is being addressed with the CWG. While it's disheartening that some of our community members chose the approach they did to bring the matter regarding Larry forward, that does not change the underlying facts that informed my decision.

Update March 31st

Megan Sanicki, Drupal Association Executive Director, and myself posted a follow-up statement on Drupal.org. As with any such decisions, and especially due to the circumstances of this one, there has been controversy, misinformation and rumors, as well as healthy conversation and debate. Many people feel hurt, worried, and confused. The fact that this matter became very public and divisive greatly saddens all of us involved, especially as we can see the pain it has caused many. We want to strongly emphasize that Drupal is an open-minded and inclusive community, and we welcome people of all backgrounds. Our community's diversity is something to cherish and celebrate as well as protect. We apologize for any anxiety we caused you and reiterate that our decision was not based on anyone's sexual practices. It will take time to heal, but we want to make a start by providing insight into our decision-making, answering questions, and placing a call for improvements to our governance, conflict-resolution processes, and communication.

Update April 9th

I posted an apology for causing grief and uncertainty, especially to those in the BDSM and kink communities who felt targeted. This incident was about specific actions of a single member of our community. This was never about sexual practices or kinks.

Update April 10th

It is clear that the current governance structure of Drupal, which relies on me being the ultimate decision maker and spokesperson for difficult governance and community membership decisions, has reached its limits. It doesn't work for many in our community -- and frankly, it does not work for me either. Community membership decisions shouldn't be determined by me or by me alone. I announced a framework for how we can evolve our governance model.

Update April 16th

The Community Working Group published a more complete explanation for what happened to address some of the misinformation and speculation: "We strongly reject any suggestion or assertion that Larry was asked to leave solely on the basis of his personal beliefs or what he does in his private life. If any of us had any reason to believe that was the case, we would have resigned immediately from the CWG."

(Comments on this post are allowed but for obvious reasons will be moderated.)

How the YMCA uses Drupal to accelerate its mission

The YMCA is a leading nonprofit dedicated to strengthening communities through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. Today, the YMCA serves more than 58 million people in 130 countries around the world. The YMCA is a loose federation, meaning that each association operates independently to best meet the needs of the local community. In the United States alone, there are 874 associations, each with their own CEO and board of directors. As associations vary in both size and scale, each YMCA is responsible for maintaining their own digital systems and tools at their own expense.

In 2016, the YMCA of Greater Twin Cities set out to develop a Drupal distribution, called Open Y. The goal of Open Y was to build a platform to enable all YMCAs to operate as a unified brand through a common technology.

Features of the Open Y platform

Open Y strives to provide the best customer experience for their members. The distribution, developed on top of Drupal 8 in partnership with Acquia and FFW, offers a robust collection of features to deliver a multi channel experience for websites, mobile applications, digital signage, and fitness screens.

On an Open Y website customers can schedule personal training appointments, look up monthly promotions, or donate to their local YMCA online. Open Y also takes advantage of Drupal 8's APIs to integrate all of their systems with Drupal. This includes integration with Open Y's Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and eCommerce partners, but also extends to fitness screens and wearables like Fitbit. This means that Open Y can use Drupal as a data repository to serve content, such as alerts or program campaigns, to digital signage screens, connected fitness consoles and popular fitness tracking applications. Open Y puts Drupal at the core of their digital platform to provide members with seamless and personalized experiences.

Philosophy of collaboration

The founding principle of Open Y is that the platform adopts a philosophy of collaboration that drives innovation and impact. Participants of Open Y have developed a charter that dictates expectations of collaboration and accountability. The tenets of the charter allow for individual associations to manage their own projects and to adopt the platform at their own pace. However, once an association adopts Open Y, they are expected to contribute back any new features to the Open Y distribution.

As a nonprofit, YMCAs cannot afford expensive proprietary licenses. Because participating YMCAs collaborate on the development of Open Y, and because there are no licensing fees associated with Drupal, the total cost of ownership is much lower than proprietary solutions. The time and resources that are saved by adopting Drupal allows YMCAs around the country to better focus on their customers' experience and lean into innovation. The same could not be achieved with proprietary software.

For example, the YMCA of Greater Seattle was the second association to adopt the Open Y platform. When building its website, the YMCA of Greater Seattle was able to repurpose over a dozen modules from the YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities. That helped Seattle save time and money in their development. Seattle then used their savings to build a new data personalization module to contribute back to the Open Y community. The YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities will be able to benefit from Seattle's work and adopt the personalization features into its own website. By contributing back and by working together on the Open Y distribution, these YMCAs are engaging in a virtuous cycle that benefits their own projects.

The momentum of Open Y

In less than one year, 18 YMCA associations have committed to adopting Open Y and over 22 other associations are currently evaluating the platform. Open Y has created a platform that all stakeholders under the YMCA brand can use to collaborate through a common technology and a shared philosophy.

Open Y is yet another example of how organizations can challenge the prevailing model of digital experience delivery. By establishing a community philosophy that encourages contribution, Open Y has realized accelerated growth, feature development, and adoption. Organizations that are sharing contributions and embracing collaboration are evolving their operating models to achieve more than ever before.

Because I am passionate about the Open Y team's mission and impact, I have committed to be an advisor and sponsor to the project. I've been advising them since November 2016. Working with Open Y is a way for me to give back, and it's been very exciting to witness their progress first hand.

If you want to help contribute to the Open Y project, consider attending their DrupalCon Baltimore session on building custom Drupal distributions for federated organizations. You can also connect with the Open Y team directly at OpenYMCA.org.

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